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20120930
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the democratic nominee arkansas gov. bill clinton. businessman ross perot entered the race as an independent candidate and the three major parties -- the two major party agreed to allow him to enter the debate. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> here now is mr. ross perot. >> good to see you. thank you. how are you? thank you. >> now, governor clinton. [applause] and now, president bush. [applause] >> and about 30 seconds, we will be going on the air. good evening, and welcome to the first of 3 debates among the major candidates for president of the united states, sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. the candidates are: independent candidate ross perot, governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee, and president george bush, the republican nominee. i am jim lehrer of the macneil- lehrer news hour on pbs, and i will be the moderator for this 90-minute event, which is taking place before an audience in the athletic complex on the campus of washington university in st. louis, missouri. three journalists will be asking questions tonight. they are john mashek of the boston globe,
public. defense secretary, leon panetta, secretary of state hillary clinton now conceding it was an act of terror. still no word, no correction from the man who steered the false narrative, president obama himself. we take up all of this here tonight with the republican strategist who served in the bush white house, and also, negative economic reports having little effect on the market today. lou joins us as does the head of the catholic league, bill donohue on where the obama administration funds anti-christian art, if you can call it art, and the fight with planned parenthood. we begin with the obama administration still trying to put forward a narrative that matches facts. terrorism is a foreign word for this administration whose lack of transparency is further qomp kateed by a complete lack of security in the consulate in an unstable, violent, muslim nation. we have the latest in this live report. katherine? >> well, thank you, lou. associate for the director of national intelligence issued a statement that seemed to give cover to the administration while at the same time acknowledg
the great clinton, you've got the great gore, but you can't do me. you tried to do me and you failed utterly. then he takes a piece of paper o oust his pocket and he signs it and he hands it to me. he goes, here, try doing that. i go thought -- we've had a running gage over the years about it. i'm very fond of him. >> what was the breakthrough with gore. >> you know, we did three weekend updates the year before in dress rehearsal and got nothing because there's no hook. it was the first debate. >> and in that first debate -- >> in the first debate he came off as a school teacher talking down to children. >> i think this is very important moment for our country. we have achieved extraordinary prosperity, and in this election america has to make an important choice. >> that's a wonderful endorsement and i want to thank you for it. >> jim, governor bush and i have two very different plans to offer tax release to american families. and his plan the wealthiest 1% of americans would receive nearly 50% of benefits. >> now bill clinton, you must have been ready to do on the first day. you must not h
as a fact-checking community finding anything wrong with bill clinton's speech at the convention. bill clinton's speech made a compelling case for barack obama, a much stronger case than barack obama or his campaign has made for his reelection. and bill clinton's speech, with very few, very minor exceptions, passed the toughest of the fact checking tests. when he went on jon stewart we found out why. on jon stewart, he said he worked on that for three or four weeks and he consulted policy experts because he wanted to make sure he got it right. was that a compelling case, democrats? i think you think it was. was it factual? yes, it was. if you are going to be prepared to govern competently, can't you make the case for your election based on a factually defensible argument? and if you can't, why should we vote for you, even if you share our ideology, candidate? >> when you took the results of this survey and sat alone with them in your study there in philadelphia, and you looked at this gap, gulf, were you proud of the american people or not? >> when you look at the finding about the sup
. the flexibility that was felt to years ago under bush and clinton, we no longer have that cushion of our own prosperity. the battling has gone worse. absolutely. >> there will be some who point out this is still an energetic place. the energy does not come from government. it might come from the lack of it. america may be forced to find out in the years ahead. >> the british prime minister david cameron was in new york this week to reaffirm his government's goal to spend with their plans & on foreign aid. if all goes to plan, the u.k. will hit the -- to spend 0.7% on foreign aid. back home, there are plenty of politicians to think that's spending so much another country's problems at a time when the u.k. is in recession is madness. emily spoke to david cameron's former speechwriter and the executive director of an action group co-founded by the musician bono. >> whenever in the department is getting cut, is this unjustifiable? >> i do not think it is. it is affordable and the figure you did not hear and which the british public years, it cost just over a penny on each pound of revenue. a pen
the eighth meeting of the clinton global initiative they addressed the globe's most challenging dilemmas. in the world lack access to clean drinking water. the ceo of the world's largest beverage company coca-cola and the inventor of the segway let me in on their plans to quench that thirst. >> so many lives are lost every day because of lack of access to clean drinking water. when you think of the numbers in the world today, maria, there are roughly one out of six people in the world today that do not have access to clean drinking water. >> so this is enabling you to get that clean water to people that don't have access to it. how does it work? >> exactly like nature does. you know, you get the oceans are full of salt water but when it rains, it rains clean water because the energy of the sun evaporates only the clean, pure water, puts it in the clouds, condenses and comes down as rain, distilled water. we built a small box that is so efficient at reclaiming all of the energy after it essentially boils and distills the water inside the box. it recycled the energy so the only energy cons
doing her bill clinton impression. >> in my state when people lose their jobs, there's a good chance i'll know them by their name. >> yes. parker can feel your pain just like bill clinton. i think one of the tasks for mitt romney is to prove he can feel your pain, not just inflict it. up next, what difference does it make when your president is also your friend? at least on facebook. thanks, parker. i appreciate it. >> nice job. ♪ ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. ♪ spread a little love my way ♪ ♪ spread a little something to remember ♪ [ female announcer ] fresh milk and real cream makes philadelphia and the moment a little richer. so it can feel like you're using nothing at all. but neosporin® eczema essentials™ is different. its multi-action formula restores visibly healthier skin in 3 days. neosporin® eczema essentials™. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. c
from democrats, clinton, maryland, thank you for waiting, go ahead, shirley. and she hung up so we're going to go next to joe. joining us from johnson, tennessee. go ahead joe. caller: good morning, dr. stein, can't tell you how glad i am you're having this conversation and god bless c-span. i am voting for ron paul in the next election and i'm throwing my vote away, that he can't win and no third party can win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, w
, in terms of obama, the great question the democratic presidents have been asking since clinton is, can you get a non-judge on the court? kagen was not a judge, but her background was judge-like. we were discussing earlier, the court that decided the board of education, one of the justices, not one had been a full time judge before. when alida replaced o'connor, they were all federal court judges. that is a terrible lack of diversity. she knew what it was like to raise money. >> she was a former state legislature. a lot of what comes in front of the court are sta chte statutes. >> for the middle. >> citizens united is a case that talks about giving money to campaigns as if it's a first amendment speech driven process. a politician may say, can i tell you what goes on, why people give money to campaigns? >> yeah. >> i would think, if this president is reelected, because there are so few court of appeals judges who are the right age, he will have to look outside the judiciary, which i agree, is a great thing. it's not only understanding how government works, it's understanding people's proble
on the correspondence between one of hillary clinton-- secretary deputy-- >> assistant deputy secretary of state. what kind of way is that to have an interview with a reporter. >> and dana millbanks says this is what you have now, every secretary of state department has had a cadre of loyalists who see themselves as counter punchers and punching hard against the media and everybody else and it's a professional, almost, guild of spin doctors and now we see one what they really sound and act and talk like. everybody in politics knows them and this time it's public domain. >> rick: and very little attention, cal, in the media to this correspondent and in the meantime, when mitt romney goes overseas during the summer and one of his aides has a little heated exchange with a reporter, it's front page news. >> well, once again, we have more evidence, as if more was needed, that the bias of the mainstream media. i agree with judy, this was news, it was legit. the big argument was between the state department and cnn as to whether it was, some agreement was lived up to, but here is the real problem, the admin
of the individual. >> governor clinton you have one minute >> schieffer: public television's jim lehrer is the dean of debate moderators. he's been at it for 24 years. he's put more questions to more candidates than any of us. >> i've always thought that the vote for the presidency was different than any other vote we cast. the presidency, it seems to me, comes down to who do we feel most comfortable with in times of crisis. >> exactly right. bob gates, the former defense secretary, he said temperament. there's such a thing as presidential temperament. you can smell it. you can feel it. it's there. and some people have it. some people don't. >> schieffer: considering the importance we place on them, it's hard to believe that presidential debates are fairly new to american politics. >> the candidates need to no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i hope he would grant me the same >> schieffer
there will be a committee to look at the decision in the u.n. but also invite the u.s., secretary clinton said only a few hours ago, we should not put any red lines to iran. when you deal with the enemies in the middle east, you don't play according to the rules of washington, d.c., jerusalem or vienna. it is a different ball game. it's a different language. if you want to work with somebody in iran to stop the nuclear race, you have to take action. and in my book i worried very directly that it is not enough to talk. we need to take action. and we have seen that sanctions are not crippling sanctions. and i think what happened the last month in the decision that our friend in canada took to close the embassy in tehran, it is a brave decision. we should have done it years ago. because the people in iran, they look at what's happening here. in two weeks' time, ahmadinejad will be traveling again to the u.s., he will go to the u.n., he will deliver a nice speech, but then he will go back to iran, and he will continue with the race to build that nuclear bomb. in my book i spoke a lot about israel, but it aff
of losing track of those goals that people like richard and hillary clinton, etc., articulated back in 2008. the american problem was that we were unable, i believe, to sort out in an effective way. when richard asked me to take this job, he made it quite clear -- those of you who know him, he is humble. he created a system where he was the sun, and all of the planets go around him. then the sun went out. the power of his personality was something we really needed. especially because bureaucratically we created not just the usual state department geographical pierre a system. we created the solar system. when the light went out, we were rocks spinning around in the dark in space. that makes us sound more pathetic than i like to think we were. but it was very difficult. at that time, we struggled to try to figure out how it could work. a fabulous job was done of focusing that effort on the afghan peace. what happened at that point was the oedipus that was built became much more difficult. the events might have made it to the cold anyway to extend this balance of long-term and short-term effo
the debates. the reason they do that is to take the measure of the individual. >> governor clinton you have one minute >> schieffer: public television's jim lehrer is the dean of debate moderators. he's been at it for 24 years. he's put more questions to more candidates than any of us. >> i've always thought that the vote for the presidency was different than any other vote we cast. the presidency, it seems to me, comes down to who do we feel most comfortable with in times of crisis. >> exactly right. bob gates, the former defense secretary, he said temperament. there's such a thing as presidential temperament. you can smell it. you can feel it. it's there. and some people have it. some people don't. >> schieffer: considering the importance we place on them, it's hard to believe that presidential debates are fairly new to american politics. >> the candidates need to no introduction. the republican candidate vice president richard m. nixon and the democratic candidate senator john f. kennedy >> reporter: they began just 52 years ago on september 26, 1960. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective
, they built the repeal. the repeal, for those of you that don't know, was signed by bill clinton as president, helping to deregulate. what did we have? the taxes on the rich were discontinued. the regulations were discontinued. what is it that we saw. we saw that by not changing the organization of capitalist enterprises, we left in place people would be incentives and resources to do everything they are going to achieve in the depression. it is sort of like winning a war, but leaving the other army in place with all of its armaments. knowing that they have a lot of resentments about how it ended up. they might, you know, use their weapons to try again. if you leave in place a corporate capitalist structure, a small group of major shareholders who own the shares in their hands, they therefore select the board of directors and and remember what a board of directors doesn't every corporation? it decides what you produce, however pursuits, were to produce, and what to do with the profits. were americans, it is a fundamental and moral political issue. here we are in a country, after all, which cl
clinton. doug, the numbers you saw on the screen, since the conventions, the president has gained four and romney has lost two, a swing of six points. >> that is where the race is. there are some polls in the swing states showing outsize leaps for obama the ink they are over sampling democrats and the mainstream media is away from what the race is. that is, a close contest. the president is about 48 or 49 percent approval and vote share. the governor's campaign has lost support. he is down around 43 percent. the 47 percent combined with the drift in the campaign has reduced his vote share, but it is still a a race, and the debate will be critical. >>gregg: this poll shows president obama at 49 and 44 and that can chain instantly. some of the media have written governor romney's obituary, this is premature. >> the media polls, the mainstream media uses the state polls like the new form of negative advertising. other negative campaigning against romney. the news organizations that are broke are spending thousands and thousands on the state polls each week to show, to push obama. look, th
this all of a sudden happen when clinton left we had a balanced budget and a surplus and things were looking good. >> of course the romney campaign points to the rising deficit, accelerated deficit rising under president obama as compared to the george w. bush years. >> dave: from george w. bush and not free from criticism. 4.9 trillion dollar increase in the nation's debt. but here we are three years into the obama presidency talking 5.36 trillion dollar increase in our nation's debt. that's pretty simple to fact check. i'm surprised joe biden continues to bait those fact checkers, with statements like that. that's a pretty-- that's a slam-dunk. >> alisyn: because people don't listen to his speeches with the calculator out and listen with their guts and resonates. they have been saying the same thing for the better part of almost four years so it must be working on the campaign trail with them. >> dave: and doing some hypnotizing before that. stare into the pen. >> alisyn: all right. let's get to your headlines, because, to tell you about right now. there was another insider attack
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)